Feminism and Palin Panic – An Update

by Clio

Almost two years ago, I wrote a blog about Governor Sarah Palin (see below), then candidate for vice president of the United States. As we all know, Governor Palin and Senator McCain lost their bid for the presidency; however, the media and pubic interest in this unique woman hasn’t waned.

 

Governor Palin’s supporters never lost faith with her after the election, pinning their hopes on another run, perhaps for president, in 2012. Since the election, her detractors continued their tirades and filed baseless ethics complaints (all but one dismissed) while the media seemed unaware that the McCain/Palin ticket failed. Until recently (a year and half after the election) did one notice a decrease in media attacks on the former Governor of Alaska.

 

The insults and assaults on Governor Palin did not sway her support base, in fact, it made the faithful even more steadfast in their devotion and energized the growing ranks of her followers on Facebook, Twitter and hundreds of social networks devoted to her. In brief, Governor Palin emerged from one of the most vicious and unrelenting “scorched earth” strategic political attacks in modern history with her dignity and reputation intact. She boldly criticizes her former political (perhaps future?) foes and opponents using the new media of the day, such as Facebook, and in her new position as a contributor to Fox News Network.

If one reads her autobiography, it is clear that Sarah Palin is a formidable adversary, fighter and competitor (not to mention a hunter). Still, after the abuse and lies spread about the governor and her family, one might expect her to step out of the heat of the spotlight and enjoy the royalties rolling in from her best-selling book, “Going Rogue.” Apparently, Sarah Palin has other plans.

 

When Sarah Palin resigned as Governor of Alaska almost a year ago, almost every pundit predicted her political demise and fade from public life — and they could not have been more wrong. Still, it’s not really fair to hold these “experts” accountable for their flawed conjecture; they are used to profiling Washington politicians and Sarah Palin is the proverbial square peg.

 

The former maverick of Wasilla, Alaska is now dubbed the new “King or Queen-maker” of the Republican party. Three out of her four candidates picked for endorsement won in last June’s Super Tuesday primaries: Carly Fiorina: California, US Senate, Nikki Haley: South Carolina, Governor, and former Governor Terry Branstad: Iowa, Governor. She continues to be in demand for endorsements and speaking engagements.

As for the future, Sarah Palin released a web video last week that highlights her “Mama Grizzly” endorsement philosophy:

“This year will be remembered as the year that common-sense conservative women get things done for our country,” Palin says in the 90-second video.

While no name are mentioned in the spot, many wonder if this video, in which Sarah Palin appears polished and, well, presidential, may be a first step toward tossing her hat into the ring for a presidential run in 2012.

 

How does this correlate with the blog below? Governor Sarah Palin is paving her own path, playing by her rules in a field once dominated by men. Her “Mama Grizzlies” are winning and the strength and will of conservative women is being acknowledged. The Bold Pursuit will follow this strong, unique woman and her efforts on behalf of Americans — women and men. We believe this is a story worth pursuing…

 

October 13, 2008

 

I first declared myself a feminist at the age of 14. In reality, I knew very little about feminism, but the ideal resonated with my strong sentiments about personal freedom. My activist English teacher discovered my interest in feminism and guided me to books by all of the popular feminist authors of the day. It was a lot for a young girl to absorb and understand. My teacher urged me to join the Student Senate, so that I could endorse her class on activism in our high school. At that time, I didn’t understand her motivation; I was just barely in my teens and still quite naive.

Today, my personal definition of feminism is very similar to what I believed in my youth; it simply means that a woman should be able to choose her own life path, work in a profession of her choosing and receive fair and equal compensation. A woman shouldn’t encounter or accept discrimination because of her gender.

So, why are feminists and others (still) alarmed by the popularity and respect so many have for Governor Palin? I find it baffling because I view Governor Palin as an example of my definition of a true feminist: she’s smart, savvy, ambitious, courageous and patriotic. She sought the highest office in her state and won. She is a mother, a Christian, a governor, a reformer and the first Republican woman nominated for the Vice Presidency.

My point is that she chose her own life path; she’s a mother and has a career. I thought that’s what feminism was all about – to be free, without discrimination, to choose our lifestyles, professions and interests. I believe Sarah Palin is one of the best feminist role models we have in public life.

While reading various blogs and message board posts, I am surprised by the comments and slurs by some posters. You don’t have to like her, agree with her or vote for her. You certainly don’t have to accept or even understand my endorsement of Governor Palin on the basis of feminism, politics or qualifications (and, yes, I thought she was very qualified) for the vice presidency. However, a little cool-headed discussion and/or disagreement would be more appropriate in your forums.

 

If you’re one of the hatemongers, please feel free to disagree with me, but tell me why – what is your position on my message? If you’re not bright enough to come up with some intelligent dialogue, well, I guess the only appropriate response, one that you’ll understand is: sticks and stones may

© The Bold Pursuit, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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2 thoughts on “Feminism and Palin Panic – An Update

  1. Clio: I read your blog about Governor Palin and feminism. You said yougot complaints from feminists about it. Only a misogynistic womancould have made them. It is beautiful: simple, clear, logicallyprogressive, interesting, and important. The stupidity of the Leftcontinues to surprise me. Just when I think I have heard the worstpossible comment one of them could make, he or she comes up withsomething only found deeper in the slime. How do they do it? We shouldhave a prize for perversity.Maybe we do: an appointment in an English,Sociology, 'Gender Studies' (whatever that could mean), or PsychologyDepartment of a major university. It makes me want to find a cavesomeplace with lots of book shelves, a good sound system with Mozart'scollected works and everything Natalie Dessay has recorded, a gardenand spring nearby, and a huge rock to roll in front of the opening,and live out my life in it. Best, Dick Lanham

  2. Dick, you make cave life sound enticing!In my naive youth, feminism simply meant 'fairness' to me. Equal pay, equal opportunity, choices in our life paths. Of course, like most revolutions (and it was), the rebels often over-reach before finding balance and focus. There was a very militant era in the feminist movement, but I think we're beyond that now. Sadly, many equate the term "feminism" with a pro-abortion agenda instead one that considers the best interests of women overall. Sarah Palin is a victory for the feminist movement and contemporary feminists failed to look beyond their (now) narrowly defined agendas to appreciate a woman who chose to be a wife, mother and politician. She is also a pro-life Christian which shouldn't conflict with a ideology of freedom and equality.Thanks for your comment, Dick.

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